Sydney! Day 4 – Vlog 305

In which there’s bacon and eggs, more cake, and we head for home!

I believe in a value-for-value model so if you liked what you saw, maybe buy me a coffee? https://www.paypal.me/SierraKiloBravo

Music
Song: The Rover
Artist: S Strong
Link: https://youtu.be/DhBCxKQPHiI

S Strong – The Rover by S Strong https://soundcloud.com/s_strong
Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b…
Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/DhBCxKQPHiI

Gear
Shot On: Sony A5000 (16mm to 50mm lens) / iPhone 6
Edited On: Final Cut Pro X

Find Me on All the Things!

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Sydney! Day 3 – Vlog 304

In which there is walking, oh god so much walking, but we finish on an absolute high!

I believe in a value-for-value model so if you liked what you saw, maybe buy me a coffee? https://www.paypal.me/SierraKiloBravo

Music
Song: Right Place Right Time
Artist: Silent Partner
Link: https://youtu.be/mcVEobrErMM

Gear
Shot On: Sony A5000 (16mm to 50mm lens) / iPhone 6
Edited On: Final Cut Pro X

Find Me on All the Things!

Sydney! Day 2 – Vlog 303

In which there are gardens, beer, and caaaaaaake!

I believe in a value-for-value model so if you liked what you saw, maybe buy me a coffee? https://www.paypal.me/SierraKiloBravo

Music
Song: Jazzy Frenchy
Artist: BenSound
Link: https://youtu.be/1kmCgTETKYo

Music by BENSOUND http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-…
Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b…
Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/1kmCgTETKYo

Gear
Shot On: Sony A5000 (16mm to 50mm lens) / iPhone 6
Edited On: Final Cut Pro X

Find Me on All the Things!

Sydney! Day 1 – Vlog 302

In which we engage in travel, food, drink, friendship!

I believe in a value-for-value model so if you liked what you saw, maybe buy me a coffee? https://www.paypal.me/SierraKiloBravo

Music
Song: Jazzaddict’s Intro
Artist: Cosimo Fogg
Link: https://youtu.be/hY4yspCQRaM

Jazzaddict’s Intro by Cosimo Fogg (201) https://soundcloud.com/cosimo-fogg
Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b…
Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/hY4yspCQRaM

Gear
Shot On: Sony A5000 (16mm to 50mm lens) / iPhone 6
Edited On: Final Cut Pro X

Find Me on All the Things!

Happy Valley (Season 1 & 2)

Is it just me or is there just so much damn good TV available at the moment? Netflix and Amazon Prime seem to be coming up with lots of good originals, or getting their hands on quality shows from elsewhere.

I want to talk about the latter today – there is a BBC show on Netflix that we just finished, and its another good example of a rock solid production. It’s called Happy Valley and stars the most excellent Sarah Lancashire. The two seasons played on BBC in 2014  and 2016, and we watched season one on Netflix earlier this year. The second season was added recently and we jumped straight in having loved the first.

Happy Valley is set in a village in Northern England and focuses on Catherine Carwood played by Sarah Lancashire. She is a strong willed, no nonsense sergeant in the local police force, and the series follows her as she deals with a kidnapping and blackmail case to which she has a personal connection, all the while raising her grandson after the suicide of her daughter, and her ex-alcoholic sister.

I have always been a fan of BBC programs, and this, like many others strikes a great balance between drama and mystery, with just the right amount of humour thrown in. Sarah Lancashire really shines as the lead, but everyone else puts in solid performances. They’re really good actors, and the show does that very British thing that you don’t often see in American programs. That is that its not all shiny and perfect. The people look a but rough, they look real, not like some cookie cutter human ideal who looks like they’ve never had a hamburger in their life. The locations are wet and damp and feel real, the actors drop spoons and fumble with the glasses, all those things that real people do.

And apart from the storylines, I think this was a big draw for me. It feels so much more believable, also the fact that each series is only six episodes long, means you can watch it all without a massive time commitment.

Both seasons are on Netflix here in Australia, and if you like a good British drama, be sure to check it out.

Outlaw King – MOVIE REVIEW

As I have said before, Netflix has been a bit of a mixed bag when it comes to content. They put out a high volume of content, much more than you could ever watch, and it seems that there are some really bad ones, a lot of middle-of-the-road-just-okay ones, and a few really good ones. One of the really good ones we have watched in recent times is Outlaw King.

So what’s it about?

In 14th-century Scotland, Robert the Bruce claims the crown and leads a fierce uprising to win back the country’s independence from English rule. Outmatched by English forces in all but courage and vengeance, Scottish warrior Robert the Bruce fights back. 

Historically this is a sequel to the events of Braveheart. In fact the end of Braveheart and the events at the beginning of Outlaw King overlap.

From a story point of view it balances the intrigue, the action, and the family matters very well. None of them are dwelled on too long, just enough to update you on what is happening in the timeline before moving on to the next thing.

From a visual perspective, the movie is gorgeous. The costumes are rich, and the cinematography really shows you the beauty of the land. The movie opens with a long single take that goes from inside the royal tent, to outside it for a duel, to back inside, to out the other side where a trebuchet launches a projectile into a far off castle that is under siege. It’s quite superb, I love it when a movie pulls that kind of thing off.

We really enjoyed it and I reckon its worth a spot in your watch list.

Holy Blood, Holy Grail – BOOK REVIEW

17980613Holy Blood, Holy Grail is a 1982 book written by Michael Baigent, Richard Leigh, and Henry Lincoln. In the book the authors put forward the hypothesis that the historical Jesus married Mary Magdalene, had one or more children, and the bloodline ended up in the south of France where they intermarried with noble families. Their ultimate conclusion is that the fabled Holy Grail, is in fact not a cup, but simultaneously the womb if Mary that bore the children, and the bloodline itself.

I first heard about this book way back at the height of interest in Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code, a book that draws very heavily on this theory – so heavily that Brown included a homage to the authors by using an anagram of their names for the name of one of his characters.

So, this book, man, it’s tough going. I consider myself to be a history nerd, and have an offshoot interest in alternate takes on history, things that go against the generally accepted narrative. I also love a good conspiracy so after reading and watching and enjoying The Da Vinci Code book and movies in the past I was keen to get into this.

I mean, it is interesting, but I just feel they take way too long to get to their point. They dedicate pages and pages going over historical connections and getting to the bottom of who the Knights Templar and the Priory of Sion were through the ages. Then after nearly 300 pages of that they go “But maybe that’s not what we were looking for. Maybe we had been looking at the wrong thing.” I couldn’t help but think “weww you took up a lot of my time to come to that conclusion on page 300 of a 450 page book.”

Finally on page 323 they pose their hypothesis, but then go off on a bit of a tangent to talk about the veracity of the gospels – I actually found this part quite interesting as I have read some very convincing arguments elsewhere about the reliability of these scriptures – and then return to their main thread. I kinda had visions of that dog from the movie Up that was easily distracted. Every time they finally got to the point before long they would go off on a long explanation of one little aspect. It grew tiresome over the course of the book.

There’s some genuinely good and interesting information in there, but I think this gets lost in all the detail. I think this book would only hold the interest of serious history nerds. Casual history fans, and even casual conspiracy theorists would, I reckon, be put off by the screeds and screeds of names and places that the authors put forward.

My conclusion is if you want to get a summary of this book, and have a bit of entertainment thrown in, then you should read The Da Vinci Code.